Orion Crew Module

Aerojet Rocketdyne led the design, manufacture and testing of the full complement of primary and redundant control required for the Orion crew module’s critical maneuvers upon a high-speed re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere. 

Twelve AR 160-pound-thrust monopropellant thrusters, designated as MR-104G engines, will be arranged in four single-engine pods and four dual-engine pods, including: two pitch-up pods with a single rocket engine; two pitch-down pods, each with a single rocket engine; one right and one left roll pods, each with dual rocket engines; and one right and one left yaw pods, each with dual rocket engines.

Quick Facts & Key Milestones

  • May 2008 - Early risk reduction testing complete
  • Sept 2008 - Additional risk reduction engine testing complete
  • April 2009 - Initial vibration and hot-fire risk reduction testing complete
  • April 2010 - Second series of vibration and hot fire risk reduction testing complete
  • March 2011 - Vibration shock and hot-fire acceptance testing complete
  • Nov 2011 - Vibration shock and hot-fire design verification testing complete
  • May 2013 - RCS pods in support of EFT-1 delivered to Kennedy Space Center
  • April 2014 -RCS pods integrated into EFT-1 Vehicle at Kennedy Space Center
  • Dec 2014 - EFT-1 Vehicle first flight